Week of September 28, 2015

What’s On Our Mind….

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Did you know congratulations were in order? Well….they are! As of Friday, we have officially made it through the first six weeks of the school year. As you all know, this period is critical as it sets the tone for so many aspects of the upcoming year (or loop as the case may be). You’ve welcomed your kids into your classroom and have immersed them in your routines and procedures. You have built community by getting to now your kids and families individually and have capitalized on opportunities for them to get to know one another. You have established yourself as a professional through your weekly communications with parents and your presentations at Curriculum Night. Undoubtedly, you have already celebrated successes within your community of learners and more than likely have encountered a few bumps in the road as well.   But most importantly, you have focused on the relationships that drive everything we do at CSD. Kudos to you for a job well done! Leslie, Marianne, and I sit back daily and marvel at how beautifully each of you execute our mission.   These kids and families are beyond blessed to have you in their lives.

At this point in the year, the focus tends to shift from laying the foundation to analyzing the specific needs of your individual students, as well as your classroom as a whole. This analysis enables us to tailor our instruction and our practices to best meet the needs of the learners in our class. Likewise, your admin team does the same. As we continue to build upon the home/school partnership that is clearly outlined in our mission and vision, it is essential that we look for ways to keep parents engaged, informed, and empowered. Lately, the admin team has been giving extensive thought around the role homework plays in this parent/teacher/student partnership. We always say the most important question an educator can ask (and answer) of him/herself is… “Why are we doing what we are doing?” or more simply… “What is our goal?” This is always important to consider, but it is immensely important when taking homework into consideration. Why you may ask? Good question! If you think about it, homework is where the major overlap between school and home occurs. Homework can bring families closer together or it can produce major sources of contention. Homework can ignite within students an innate curiosity and love for learning, or it can extinguish the flame altogether. So if viewed through that lens, homework is pretty dang important!

This is a complex topic – one that we cannot begin to address thoroughly enough in just one post on a staff weekly blog – but the admin team hopes to continue to ponder and explore these ideas as the year goes on. We would like to start by asking you all to give some reflective thought to the homework practices in your own classrooms and grade levels with the following questions in mind:

Why am I assigning this? What is the purpose/goal of this assignment?

How do I know I’m accomplishing my goal?

Here are a few really terrific articles on the characteristics of quality homework.   We hope that you will take some time to read these articles as you reflect on your own practices and actively consider ways in which you might need to adjust as well as ways you are on target.

Five Hallmarks of Good Homework by Cathy Vatterott

http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Five-Hallmarks-of-Good-Homework.aspx

Smart Homework: 13 Ways to Make It Meaningful by Rick Wormeli

http://www.middleweb.com/16815/smart-homework-13-ways-make-meaningful/

High Quality Homework by Nancy Frey and Douglas Fisher

http://fisherandfrey.com/uploads/posts/Homework_NASSP.pdf

Lastly, we encourage each of you to consider getting feedback from our most important source – our students. Oftentimes it is so easy to make false assumptions about how they are feeling. It is also common for us to grossly underestimate the amount of time some kids are spending on homework. As educators, we are so caught up in teaching and preparing them for the next step/grade/level that we sometimes neglect to consider if what we are doing is actually working. Perhaps there is a better way, and perhaps they may have some really great feedback for us to consider. You never know… At any rate, most all articles on this topic note the importance of empowering students through choice. While we can never fully individualize homework for every single one of our students (that would be crazy!!!), I do think we can find ways to offer choice so that students can determine what is most effective/meaningful for them. So going into these next few weeks, we hope that you will consider the following:

Can the students articulate the goal of each assignment? (Why am I doing this?)

Does the assignment give the student some way to “own” his/her own learning?

Do I have a firm grasp on the amount of time my students are spending on weekly homework?

In closing, please know that admin knows beyond a shadow of a doubt that everything you do for your students comes from a place of good intentions. Please know that we can’t thank you enough for the blood, sweat, and tears that you pour into your practice daily.   We truly remain in awe of your talent, your commitment, and your sincere love for your students. Thank you for keeping an open heart and for always looking for ways to grow and learn. Complacency truly is the enemy of excellence, and as always, our goal is to stay focused on #whatmatters.

Love,
Juli

The Week at a Glance:
Monday, September 28th:
Joy Warner’s Birthday. 🙂
Tuesday, September 29th:
Juli at DPI meeting in morning
Wednesday, September 30th:
Mimi Siadak – Teacher Leader
Thursday, October 1st:
Marianne out (send good vibes to Leah who is having a root canal!)
1st Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip – 8:30 departure
Friday, October 2nd:
Spirit Friday (8:40)
Staff Flu Clinic – http://www.signupgenius.com/go/20f0f48acac283-csdelemmiddle/417053
Make Up Pictures

Looking Ahead….
October 5 – Parent Advisory Meeting at HS – 7:30p.m.-8:30p.m.
October 7 – Staff Meeting – Baby Shower for baby D’Esterre
October 8 & 9 – 1st Grade Fairy Tale Ball
October 13 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m. and 7:00p.m.
October 14 – Staff Mindfulness Training (Interest Meeting)
October 16 – CSD Homecoming!
October 21-25 – Community HS Musical – Pippin
October 21 – 5th Grade Proof of Concept; K-7 Staff Meeting
October 22 – Kindergarten Pumpkin Carving 1:00p.m.
October 23 – Elementary Night at HS Football Game
October 28 – K-5 Parade of Fiction
October 29 & 30 – Teacher Workdays – Optional Parent/Teacher Conferences
November 2 – Parent Advisory at HS at 7:30 – Cybersafety Guest Speaker
November 3 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m.
November 4 – K-7 Staff Meeting
November 6 – 7th Grade Rube Goldberg Exhibition (MS Gym); 3rd Grade Bones Performance (MS Black Box)
November 11 – Veteran’s Day Holiday – NO SCHOOL
November 12-14 – Book Fair
November 13 – 6th Grade Greek Day
November 19 – 2nd Grade Performances
November 20 – Africa Day
November 25-29 – Thanksgiving Holidays – NO SCHOOL

Teaching Tips:

Gifted Education Resources:

“As with all students, the programming of instruction for gifted students should match the identified needs of students and may take many forms.”(http://www.nsgt.org/differentiating-learning-for-gifted-students/)

These two websites were found on our resource page provided by Anthony.

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/

http://www.nagc.org/

In addition I found this PpT from SlideShare to quite helpful:

differentiatinginstructionforgiftedlearners-090329174007-phpapp01

Please let Juli, Leslie or I know if you need help and support with planning and instruction in this area.  It may be helpful to discuss this at your team meetings in the next few weeks.

Thought-Provoking:

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Week of September 21, 2015

The Week Ahead:

Happy Sunday!  I hope you all have enjoyed the beautiful weather this weekend and were able to spend some time with family and friends.  Welcome back to our fifth grade teachers and students from Barrier Island!  We can’t wait to hear all about your adventures.  A huge thanks to all of our chaperones for making this trip possible.  I know it is one of the highlights of our student’s fifth grade experience!

Curriculum night was a great success!  We had a wonderful turn out, and I have heard nothing but good things about each and every one of your classrooms.  I know this made for a long day for all of you, but thank you, thank you for taking time away from your own families to better help the parents of your students.  I believe the payoff will be tremendous!

pumpkinPlease take a moment to read the Choice Literacy article below.  This article spoke to me for lots of reasons.  One of the many reasons it struck a chord with me is that I recently have gotten my own lesson from bees.  My children decided that they wanted to grow  pumpkins in our backyard.  I said, why not, nothing else grows back there, certainly not grass!  Guess what, pumpkins actually do!  We have a whole patch of pumpkins growing in our backyard!  We saved our seeds from our Halloween pumpkins last year and planted them this summer.  I was a bit skeptical, but you would not believe the crazy pumpkin vines I have growing in my backyard!  They have lots of large yellow flower blossoms on them, which made me think we were going to have lots of pumpkins.  Luckily, my dad knows a bit about farming and was at our house this summer checking out our pumpkin vine.  I was marveling at how many pumpkins I thought we would have due to the fact that this gigantic vine had so many blooms on it.  He was quick to tell me that no matter how many blooms I had that without any bees we wouldn’t have a single pumpkin!  I hadn’t really thought about that.  You see, the bees are what pollinate the flower and allow it to actually turn into a pumpkin.  My kids and I began to look for bees constantly, hoping that they would show up to pollinate our pumpkin blossoms.  Sure enough, they came, and guess what…we have a real pumpkin and three more potential ones in the works!  Thank goodness for those bees, for without them we would just have a giant vine!  This reminds me of teaching and learning.  You all are like the bees, “pollinating” your students so that they can flourish and grow into what they are meant to be!  Have a wonderful week!

Leslie

Lessons from Bees

For so work the honey-bees, creatures that by a rule in nature teach the act of order to a peopled kingdom.

William Shakespeare
A few years ago, my dad noticed a swarm of bees in the shape of a hive dangling from a tree outside his upstairs office window. At first, he was terrified and hesitant to go outside, but after contacting a local beekeeper to relocate the hive, his perspective changed. After a few hours with an expert, he wanted to share his newly gained knowledge of bees with everyone he met.

He would hear me sneeze and say, “Did you know that eating locally sourced honey is the best way to work up an immunity to local pollens?”

A fly would buzz past lazily, and he would jump at the chance to say, “Good thing that’s not a bee! Remember when I had that swarm of thousands of bees? You know, they were swarming there with the queen while other bees scouted out a new location.”

After hearing Dad’s bee facts over the course of several years, my disdain for these stinging insects began to grow into admiration. Bees really are fascinating, and I think they have a lot to teach us.

Here are five of my favorite bee facts and what they taught me:

1. Honey production is reduced when a bee colony is without a queen. When a queen bee dies, the rest of the bees in the hive become unsettled and disorganized until a new queen is found. Bees need strong leadership, just like teachers and students. We have all experienced the effects of a breakdown in leadership, whether it was our own leadership in the classroom or on a building-wide level. Strong leadership is key.

2. When bees collect nectar, they are gathering for the good of the colony. They store the nectar in crops in their throats and carry it back to the hive. Working together produces more honey. As teachers, we can easily fall into the trap of working in isolation. When we can find ways to pool resources and collaborate, we can work more efficiently. Working together is more effective than working alone.

3. Bees communicate by dancing. When a scout returns to a swarm of bees, it dances to demonstrate the quality of the new location. Dancing is a joyful form of communication. We often become so entrenched in our daily routines that we forget to focus on what matters. Remember to share joy.

4. Bees sting when they feel threatened. Humans are often the victims of uncomfortable stings without even intending to pose a threat. Often as educators, we displace our response to the pressure of mandates and standardized tests and end up stinging innocent victims, unfortunately sometimes including students. Think before you sting.

5. Bees create honey, which is the only food that includes all the nutrients required to sustain life. Honey contains water along with vitamins, minerals, and enzymes. It is such a simple food, yet holds so much power. We, too, need to simplify in our classrooms, to focus on the essentials that sustain the readers and writers in our care. There is power in simplicity.

Bees provide so many lessons about communities and groups.

Christy Rush-Levine
Contributor, Choice Literacy

The Week at a Glance:

Monday, September 21st:

Tuesday, September 22nd:
Juli out of building at PowerSchool Meeting
Wednesday, September 23rd:
NO SCHOOL!  Enjoy!
Thursday, September 24th:

Friday, September 25th:
4th Grade Pirate Parade at 8:30

Looking Ahead….
October 1 – 1st Grade Field Trip to Children’s Theater
October 2 – Elem Spirit Friday; Staff Flu Clinic
October 5 – Parent Advisory Meeting at HS – 7:30p.m.-8:30p.m.
October 7 – 5th Grade PoC Field Test; Staff Meeting – Baby Shower for baby D’Esterre
October 8 & 9 – 1st Grade Fairy Tale Ball
October 13 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m. and 7:00p.m.
October 16 – CSD Homecoming!
October 21-25 – Community HS Musical – Pippin
October 21 – K-7 Staff Meeting
October 23 – Elementary Night at HS Football Game
October 28 – K-5 Parade of Fiction
October 29 & 30 – Teacher Workdays – Optional Parent/Teacher Conferences
November 2 – Parent Advisory at HS at 7:30 – Cybersafety Guest Speaker
November 3 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m.
November 4 – K-7 Staff Meeting
November 6 – 7th Grade Rube Goldberg Exhibition (MS Gym); 3rd Grade Bones Performance (MS Black Box)
November 11 – Veteran’s Day Holiday – NO SCHOOL
November 13 – 6th Grade Greek Day
November 19 – 2nd Grade Performances
November 20 – Africa Day
November 25-29 – Thanksgiving Holidays – NO SCHOOL

Reminders:

Teaching Tips:

http://www.smartclassroommanagement.com/2015/09/19/why-you-should-never-punish-your-entire-class-for-the-behavior-of-a-few/

I had been reading Better than Carrots or Sticks: Restorative Practices for Positive Classroom Management (Smith, D., Fisher, D., and Frey, N. 2015)

They discuss two important factors of an effective learning environment: relationships and high-quality instruction.  “When students have strong, trusting relationships both with the adults in the school and with their peers, and when their lessons are interesting and relevant, it’s harder fro them to misbehave.” (Smith, D., Fisher, D., and Frey, N. 2015 p. 2)

  • Students want teachers to take them seriously.
  • Students want to teachers to challenge them to think.
  • Students want teachers to nurture their self-respect.
  • Students want teachers to show them that they can make a difference.
  • Students want teachers to point them toward their goals.
  • Students want teachers to make them feel important.
  • Students want teachers to build on their interests.
  • Students want teachers to tap their creativity.
  • Students want teachers to bring out the best in them.

Think about this quote from Frederick Douglass:

it-is-easier-to-build-strong-children-than-to-repair-broken-men-frederick-douglass

Week of September 14, 2015

The Week Ahead:

Happy Monday!  We hope you all had a wonderful long weekend!  It is homecoming week!  No, I don’t mean CSD football homecoming, this is an even better kind of homecoming…and we have not one but THREE homecoming queens! 🙂  This week we welcome our sweet Mandy Robinson back from maternity leave!  Please give her lots of love and support as she heads back to her first grade babies.  HUGE thanks to Robin Stephens for filling in for Mandy while she was spending some much needed mommy time with sweet baby Riggins.  Another familiar face we will be happy to see this week is our beloved Pam Haan!  She will be returning for a short time this week before her class heads off to Barrier Island, and then she will return to us full time next week once her kiddos are back on the CSD mainland!  HUGE thanks to Lisa Nageotte for filling in for Pam while she has been recovering.  One more homecoming of sorts is our dear Mary Mayo!  She made the journey home this past week from California to Charlotte .  Although she isn’t quite ready to return to CSD, we are thrilled that she is able to be near Joe , her boys, family and friends.  Mary is still working hard to return to her CSD family.  Right now she is at the Carolinas Rehabilitation Center in Charlotte.  Joe has said that visitors are welcome Monday-Friday after 4 pm and anytime on Saturday or Sunday.  He has also asked that for now that it be adult visitors only.  If you would like to email Joe to set up a time to visit Mary his email address is josephmayo@bellsouth.net

This week we send our fifth grade students off to Barrier Island.  We wish them safe travels and hope they have lots of fun on their big fifth grade adventure!

Another big happening around CSD this week is our Curriculum Night.  We expect a large turn out for this event.  This is a great time to share with parents important information about your classroom.  If there are certain routines and procedures you want students to understand, make sure you share these with parents so they can reinforce these at home.  Also make sure that parents are clear on your expectations for homework.  In elementary, parents often have questions about how we teach math and spelling, because it looks a bit different from the way they may have learned these subjects in school.  It may be a good idea to give a few examples of how these subjects are taught.  If you have questions or need help please let us know how we can support you.  The link to the article below may be a good one to read or share certain pieces with parents.  It gives some wonderful examples of ways parents can have conversations at home with their child about their learning.  Also, remember to have parents sign up for any volunteer jobs you need in your classroom.  Please make sure you include if you haven’t already, room mom and a teacher appreciation representative mom.  Have a wonderful week!

Leslie

Helping Parents Talk with Students

https://www.choiceliteracy.com/articles-detail-view-print.php?id=2092

The Week at a Glance:
Tuesday, September 15th:
Juli at DPI meeting (out of building)
K-7 Breakfast provided by Life Fellowship
Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Treat provided by Teacher Appreciation Committee
Fundraising Discount Cards due
Wednesday, September 16th:
Marianne at BI
K-7 Curriculum Night (6:00-8:00)
Thursday, September 17th:
Marianne at BI
Friday, September 18th:
Marianne at BI
6th Grade Ropes Course (McCoy, Godkin, Merithew, Pagan)
4th Grade Old Salem Field Trip

Looking Ahead….
September 23 – Holiday – NO SCHOOL
September 25 – 4th Grade Pirate Parade at 8:30
October 1 – 1st Grade Field Trip to Children’s Theater
October 2 – Elem Spirit Friday; Staff Flu Clinic
October 5 – Parent Advisory Meeting at HS – 7:30p.m.-8:30p.m.
October 7 – 5th Grade PoC Field Test; Staff Meeting – Baby Shower for baby D’Esterre
October 8 & 9 – 1st Grade Fairy Tale Ball
October 13 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m. and 7:00p.m.
October 16 – CSD Homecoming!
October 21-25 – Community HS Musical – Pippin
October 20 – K-7 Lottery Open House 7:00p.m.
October 21 – K-7 Staff Meeting
October 23 – Elementary Night at HS Football Game
October 28 – K-5 Parade of Fiction
October 29 & 30 – Teacher Workdays – Optional Parent/Teacher Conferences
November 2 – Parent Advisory at HS at 7:30 – Cybersafety Guest Speaker
November 3 – K-7 Lottery Open House 9:30a.m. and 7:00p.m.
November 4 – K-7 Staff Meeting
November 6 – 7th Grade Rube Goldberg Exhibition (MS Gym)
November 11 – Veteran’s Day Holiday – NO SCHOOL
November 13 – 6th Grade Greek Day
November 19 – 2nd Grade Performances
November 20 – Africa Day
November 25-29 – Thanksgiving Holidays – NO SCHOOL

Reminders:
Juli will be in Durham on Tuesday for a DPI meeting.
Marianne will be at Barrier Island with our 5th grade class from September 16-18.

Teaching Tips for Curriculum Night:

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2012/09/tips-stress-free-curriculum-night

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2014/09/tips-easy-and-almost-paper-free-curriculum-night

Great Things We Noticed:

Collaboration!  Whether it is helping out in early morning carpool, the front parking, or a child who was injured on the playground we are always overwhelmed by the response of our CSD staff members!  Thank you for your dedication to our students and school.

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Week of September 7, 2015

The Week Ahead:

When I was a little girl I spent countless hours “playing school.”  I set up my own classroom in our basement with a chalkboard, my own “grade book”, and a giant mug filled with “coffee” (water) because these were the things I saw my teachers using and doing.  I taught countless lessons to my stuffed animals and dolls.  There were always the students who excelled, and then I had a group of naughty students who “failed”.  How did I know to do this as a child?  There were subtle messages I got from my own teachers.  Thinking back on it, they were pretty powerful messages that the grown ups in my life gave to me that I mimicked.  What subtle messages do we give our students?  Do we unintentionally send messages that some students excel and others fail?

As a society we often view creative play as just that – mindless entertainment that children do to keep themselves busy.  However, I would greatly disagree that play is some of the most important work and learning that students experience.  These are opportunities for them to try out roles and experiences in a safe environment.  It is a time when we as the teacher can observe what students know, how they interact with peers, and did the message we wanted to send students come across in the way it was intended?  We often think play is only important in preschool or kindergarten.  However, I would argue that play is important in all grade levels.  Yes, it looks different in various grade levels, but the importance is equally valuable no matter the grade.  Are you giving your students time to “play?”  Step back and watch, listen and learn from your students and see if they are practicing the important lessons you want them to learn in their play.  Are the subtle messages you are sending ones that you intend to send or are they ones you wish to change? The lessons of play can be pretty powerful for us as the adults as well!  Have a wonderful week!

Leslie

Playing School

  Creative play is like a spring that bubbles up from deep within a child.

Joan Almon
One day, Ava asked for an extra copy of a news magazine that I was going to put in the recycling bin in our classroom.

“I play school,”  she confessed.

Because I know that children make sense of the world through play, I couldn’t resist asking, “Really? What do you do when you play school?”

I am always a bit hesitant when I ask students who play school what they actually do because I know their play will tell me a lot about the subtle messages they are getting from being in our classroom.

“Well, you know,” Ava said, “I have an easel and that big paper you have on it. I also have a dry erase board that I can connect to my computer and use it like our Smartboard. I pull things up on my computer when I am teaching things. Like last week, we used Pixie to create something. I call over groups like you do. I ask them if they like what they are reading and what they are thinking.”

I breathed a sigh of relief that Ava’s students did not have to sit through testing or that the important things about her school weren’t announcements or grading papers. Instead she talked about the talk and the joy and learning that goes on in her classroom.

Ava continued, “When my friends come over I make them be principal or something – I don’t really care what they are as long as I get to be the teacher. You know I want to be a teacher when I grow up.  Do you know why I think I’ll make a good teacher?”

I was worried about this next answer.  I knew it would tell me a lot about her beliefs about my role in her learning.

She said,  “I love kids and being with them and talking to them. I love to learn and I like to read.  A lot. And, well, teachers get some extra days off.”

I breathed another sigh of relief and asked, “Do your students learn?”

Ava looked at me with amusement and said, “Mrs Sibberson, I play with my American Girl Dolls. They are pretend.”

I always learn so much listening to my students who “play school” at home. These conversations let me step back and see our classroom as our students see it. I have been carrying my conversation with Ava with me as I think about the new school year. What subtle messages will I give them about what it means to be a learner in a classroom in a school?  When my new students go home and play school, what will they do? What will they think is important? What will they think makes a good teacher?

Franki Sibberson
Contributor, Choice Literacy

Continuing with the topic of play check out these great articles on the benefits of outside play…

We all know that outdoor recess for students is important.  It helps children with overall health, social and moral development.  Although our outdoor space is limited we can all be creative!  Safety is a concern so please brainstorm as a grade level on some fresh ideas.  Please read the article below that discusses benefits of outdoor play.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/141891-the-benefits-outdoor-play-children/

We also found a list of games that can used for outdoor time:

http://www.gameskidsplay.net/

The Week at a Glance:
Tuesday, September 8th:
Wednesday, September 9th: Yearbook Pictures
Thursday, September 10th: Yearbook Pictures
Friday, September 11th: Yearbook Pictures; 6th Grade Ropes Course (Angell, Harrison, Aichele, Birch)

Looking Ahead….
September 14 – Holiday – NO SCHOOL
September 15 – Fundraising Discount Cards & $ due
September 16 – K-7 Curriculum Night (6:00p.m.-8:00p.m.) NO STAFF MEETING
September 16-18 – 5th Grade Barrier Island Field Trip
September 18 – 6th Grade Ropes Course (McCoy, Godkin, Merithew, Pagan)
September 23 – Holiday – NO SCHOOL
October 1 – 1st Grade Field Trip to Children’s Theater
October 2 – Elem Spirit Friday
October 5 – Parent Advisory Meeting at HS – 7:30p.m.-8:30p.m.
October 7 – Staff Meeting – Baby Shower for baby D’Esterre
October 8 & 9 – 1st Grade Fairy Tale Ball
October 16 – CSD Homecoming!
October 28 – K-5 Parade of Fiction
October 29 & 30 – Teacher Workdays – Optional Parent/Teacher Conferences
November 2 – Parent Advisory at HS at 7:30 – Cybersafety Guest Speaker
November 4 – K-7 Staff Meeting
November 11 – Veteran’s Day Holiday – NO SCHOOL
November 13 – 6th Grade Greek Day
November 19 – 2nd Grade Performances
November 20 – Africa Day
November 25-29 – Thanksgiving Holidays – NO SCHOOL

Reminders:

Heads up…We will be conducting a Fire Drill in the near future. You may want to go ahead and prepare your class(es) with the exit Plan for your classroom.

Grades 6 and 7 – Make sure you have turned in the original copies of the Yellow Cards to the front desk.  You may make copies for your own files if you like.  This must be done immediately!  (Tracie currently only has 65 cards, so that means we are missing about 3/4 of the cards…)

Staff workouts start this week with our very own Dani Angell!  Thank you, Dani, for providing this awesome service to staff!  Tuesdays @ 3:30 in MS gym!

Don’t forget to send K-7 Admin a copy of the Team Norms you set at last week’s staff meeting.  🙂

Teaching Tips:

Hold-Ups (Himmele & Himmele, 2009) are interaction-based activities that use response cards.  In these activities , students interactively reflect on a prompt and hold up a card, a paper, or whiteboard in response.

Types of Hold-ups

  1. Selected Response Hold-Ups
  2. Number Card Hold-Ups
  3. True/Not True Hold-Ups
  4. Multiple- Choice Holds Ups
  5. Whiteboard Hold-Ups

How They Work:

  1. Ask the students to think about and discuss their responses to a set of prepared questions.
  2. Before students hold up their cards, have them pair-share or talk in small groups.  They should not hold up their cards until told to do so.
  3. Say “Hold it up.”
  4. Students hold up their cards.  Select students to share their group’s rationale for their choice.

Search in our Google Drive for “Total Participation TPT.”  You will find various cards already done for you!

Here are some others:

Total Participation HoldUps

Great Things We Noticed:

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