Week of February 29, 2016

Dear Staff,

Happy Sunday!  Tomorrow is Leap Day and then we are headed into the madness of March!  I love the Choice Literacy article this week on just this topic!  As we head into test prep season don’t become jaded by what your kids can’t do.  Remember the one hundred and some odd days of all the wonderful things you have taught them and how far they  have come since they entered your classroom in August.  For some it may be that their gains are not academic but behavioral.  That in itself is a huge accomplishment!  It may be the child who knew none of his/her math facts in the beginning of the year and now he/she knows some or all of them.  Think of the child who wasn’t a reader when he entered your class and now you can’t tear him away from books.  Remember the child who wouldn’t put one word down on a page back in September?  Now think of the pages he/she produces.  These are the things that matter and are what we need to remember when we get swept away in the madness of March.  Hold on tight, because before you know it May will be here!  Have a wonderful week and don’t forget to soak in every moment of your students and all they have accomplished!

The Game of Life

If you accept the expectations of others, especially negative ones, then you will never change the outcome.
Michael Jordan


We’re heading into March Madness, that nutty time when impossible dreams come true for some basketball players and their obsessive fans. My vote this winter for the most captivating basketball player (and fan!) goes to Aaron Miller. He is the boy in the photo who is meeting LeBron James – have you ever seen an expression of such pure joy and disbelief on anyone’s face?

I was skimming the newspaper a few months ago and was instantly drawn into Aaron’s story. Aaron is 16 years old. He had a stroke shortly after he was born, and doctors told his parents, “Aaron will never be able to walk or talk – he will always be severely disabled.” The parents refused to accept this prognosis. They moved near a world-class hospital in Boston to work with a different team of physicians. After many surgeries and treatments, Aaron began walking when he was almost five, and from then on he made rapid physical and cognitive progress. But even before he could walk, young Aaron loved to spend hours throwing baskets through a small hoop on the bureau near his bed.

In the moment captured on film, LeBron jogged over to hug Aaron and show him respect. Aaron had been recognized as an “Everyday Hero” at a Boston Celtics game during a break in the action. LeBron heard a bit of his story as he was in a huddle with teammates, and was inspired by Aaron’s perseverance. Now in high school, Aaron plays basketball and golf on teams for students with disabilities.

I can’t imagine the grit it takes to refuse to accept the prognosis of experts – it must look a lot like madness. But what if those doctors, instead of predicting a grim future for Aaron, had said, “Your son will grow up to be so remarkable that one day the greatest basketball player of his generation will honor him in front of thousands of fans?” Crazy, but that is exactly what happened. THAT is reality.

Aaron’s father was quoted in the Boston Globe when asked how his son felt about meeting LeBron. He said, “The whole thing has left Aaron just in awe, but he really appreciates it. He’s not a kid that likes the spotlight or anything. He’s just happy in his own quiet world, and this really kind of made him shine.”

March is the season of basketball madness, and it’s also a time of heavy testing in schools. I think one of the reasons teachers can get pretty defiant about tests is that they are by definition limiting – often only a few students can excel. Exams are used to sort, predict, and sometimes close out options very early in lives and careers. But in the quiet world of a classroom, anyone can shine daily, and anything is possible. Aaron Miller failed almost every physical and cognitive test given to him shortly after birth. It’s a good thing to remember when we begin to fixate too much on what the children in front of us can’t do . . . yet.

Brenda Power

Founder, Choice Literacy

 

The Week at a Glance

Monday, February 29th:
Garren to Huntersville Oaks
Tuesday, March 1st
Hurlbut to Huntersville Oaks
James to The Laurels
Wednesday, March 2nd: 
Juli at HS doing post-ob conferences and teacher observations
9:00 – Waitlist Open House and Tours
Staff Meeting:
K-3 – Math Instruction with Lucia
4-7 – Math Vertical Alignment
6-7 – Middle School Common Planning Time
6th Grade Butterfly Project Field Trip
5th Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip, Read Across America Day
Thursday, March 3rd: 
2nd Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip
Friday, March 4th: 
Hoover – Teacher Leader (Juli out)

Looking Ahead….
March 7 – 4th Grade to JA Biztown
March 7 – Parent Advisory: Future Athletics Facility Opportunity – 7:30 HS BB
March 7 – Parent Advisory – 7:30 at HS
March 9 – Proof of Concept – 5th Grade
March 9 – MS Info Session for Rising 6th Grade Parents 7:00 p.m. in MS Gym
March 10 – MS Info Session for Rising 6th Grade Parents 8:30 a.m. in MS Gym
March 10 & 11 – 3rd Grade Wax Museum
March 10 – 2nd Grade Art Gallery
March 11 – 5th Grade Opera Load In
March 11 – 3rd Grade Wax Museum
March 13 – Daylight Savings Time Begins
March 14-18 – 5th Grade Opera
March 17-19 – MS Musical – The Lion King
March 17 – 3rd Grade Walking Tour of Charlotte
March 18 – 7th Grade Asia Day
March 21-24 – 5th Grade Opera
March 25-April 3 – SPRING BREAK
April 4 – Classes resume; *EOG Test Prep Window Begins
April 5 – Parent Advisory 8:30 a.m. at HS
April 8 – 4th Grade to Children’s Theater
April 8 – MS Pep Rally at 1:30 in MS Gym & CSD SPIRIT DAY!
April 12 – 2nd Rescue Ranch Field Trip (2 classes)
April 14 – 3rd Grade Davidson Walking Tour
April 14 – Drama EOY at lower school K/1
April 15 – 8th Practicum Dance Party for K5
April 18-April 22 – Earth Days K-5
April 19 – 2nd Rescue Ranch Field Trip (2 classes)
April 20 – 6th/7th Dance Class Sharing
April 22 – 6th UNCC Botanical Gardens
April 22 – CSD Golf Tournament
April 25 – K7 Teacher Appreciation Cinco De Mayo Luncheon
April 28 – SNOW MAKE UP DAY
April 29 – Teacher Workday
May 6 – 6th UNCC Botanical Gardens
May 7 – Spartan 5K & Half Marathon
May 10 – 1st Rainforest/Endangered Species Science Fair
May 12 – Kindergarten Oceans Play
May 13 – May 14 – CSD Staff Retreat
May 17 – 4th Stone Mountain
May 17 – 5th Grade Science EOG
May 18 – 3-8 Reading EOG
May 19 – 3-8 Math EOG
May 24 – 25 – 7th Grade Ropes Course
May 25 – 6th Holocaust Museum–Parents & Family
May 26 – 1st Hiddenite Mine Field Trip
May 26 – 4th Economic Fair
May 26 – 6th Holocaust Museum–Open to Public
May 27 – Kindergarten Screening
May 27 – Teacher Workday; Optional Parent Conferences
May 30 – Memorial Day HOLIDAY – No school
May 31 – 3rd Kool Kats Cafe
May 31 – 7th Change Project
May 31 – Kindergarten Water Day
May 31 – State of the School Address
June 1 – Last Day of School
June 2 – Graduation
June 2 & 3 – Teacher Workdays

NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

The NC Teacher Working Conditions survey that is done in NC every two years will go out March 1.  Please make this a high priority for all lead teachers.  CSD always has 100% participation and this is an important part of the feedback we get as a school and as a state.  Be on the lookout for your survey codes! Thanks, as always, for your thoughtful feedback!

EOG Test Prep

Believe it or not, EOG Test Prep time will be here before you know it.  Please keep the following timeframe in mind as you prepare lessons in the weeks to come.
-Week of May 16th is 3-8 EOG Testing.
-Spring Break  is March 25-April 3; Classes resume April 4.  *The week of April 4th is the beginning of the 6 week test prep window.
-EOG pre-test/diagnostic testing should be done prior to Spring Break.  Admin will be sitting down with all teams to discuss results and formulate plans for differentiated instruction once pre-testing and data analysis are complete.  Please let us know if you need any assistance prior to that time.  We are always happy to help!

Teaching Tips with Marianne

This week during our Parenting with Love and Logic® sessions we discussed that we gain more control when we share control with our children.  We know as teachers when we give students choices we have far fewer power struggles.

Here is a resource you may find helpful:
http://www.theboardermovie.com/wcdss/Teacher%20Handouts/teachertips0001.pdf

Guidelines for Sharing Control Through Choices

Love and Logic Rules for Choices

  • Never give a choice on an issue that might cause a problem for you or for anyone else.
  • For each choice, give only two options, each of which will be OK with you.
  • If the child doesn’t decide in ten seconds, decide for him or her.
  • Only give choices that fit with your value system.Some Love and Logic Examples of Little Choices
    • Would you like to wear your coat or carry it?
    • Are you going to clean the garage or mow the lawn this week?
    • Will you have these chores done tomorrow? Or do you need an extra day to get them finished?
    • Are you having peas or carrots as your vegetable tonight?
    • Are you going to bed now? Or would you like to wait 15 minutes?
    • Can you stay with us and stop that, or do you need to leave for a while and come back when you are sweet?
    • Are you going to put your pajamas on first or brush your teeth first?
    • Will you be home at 10:00? Or do you need an extra half hour with your friends?
    • Are you guys going to stop bickering? Or would you rather pay me for having to hear it?The Love and Logic People2207 Jackson Street, Golden, CO 80401 1-800-338-4065 www.loveandlogic.com

©Jim Fay 1998 • Permission granted for photocopy reproduction. Please do not alter or modify contents. For more information, call The Love and Logic Institute, Inc. at (800) 338-4065.

 

Week of February 22, 2016

Dear Staff,

Thank you for another wonderful week of learning and fun!  We are especially grateful to the MS teachers for their flexibility and support during the MS Dance Performances.  You all never cease to amaze us with you willingness to put kids first and work together for the collective success of all.  Thank you does not suffice!  Unfortunately, this type of teamwork is rare in many work environments, and we are so grateful that our students get to witness these types of working relationships in action.  As we all know, what we do is so much more impactful than what we say, so thank you for leading by example.  Our hats are off to YOU!

Also, we want to thank Amy Tomalis and Andie Snyder for leading us in such a thought-provoking Staff Meeting on Wednesday about Teaching Complexity.  If you were unable to attend, we ask that you please review the materials and discuss with your team.

https://docs.google.com/a/csdnc.org/presentation/d/1tzn0qXx9znNJwkCV4JGGflZGMXTk2-nIYUqhLUzoHfM/edit?usp=sharing

While all of this was really interesting, we were particularly intrigued with the research on the most significant factor that impact achievement.  Please take a few moments to ponder this list, and think on how this aligns with your individual practice.

Screen Shot 2016-02-19 at 9.34.02 AM

Are there areas in which you excel?  Are there areas you feel need improvement?  These are the questions that propel us to the next level of excellence in teaching, and this type of reflection is essential to our professional growth.  We encourage you to think deeply about these topics and then reach out for support if you feel there are areas in which you could improve.  Conversely, if you feel you are strong in a particular area, please share your knowledge and expertise with others!  This is how we all become stronger, both as individuals and as a team.

The Week at a Glance

Monday, February 22nd:
4:00 – CSD 2016-2017 Lottery – HS Black Box
Tuesday, February 23rd:
Schultz to Laurels
Walker to Huntersville Oaks
Wednesday, February 24th: 
Beth Knight Teacher Leader
6:30 – Mandatory Spring Sports Meeting at HS
Thursday, February 25th: 
Westbrook/Sharp to Olde Knox Commons
Thompson to Huntersville Oaks
Friday, February 26th: 

Looking Ahead….

March 2 – Butterfly Project – 6th Grade
March 2 – 5th Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip, Read Across America Day
March 3 – 2nd Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip
March 4 – 2nd Grade Art Gallery
March 4 – 7th Grade Field Trip to Bodyworks at Discovery Place
March 7 – 4th Grade to JA Biztown
March 7 – Parent Advisory – 7:30 at HS
March 9 – Proof of Concept – 5th Grade
March 10 & 11 – 3rd Grade Wax Museum
March 11 – 5th Grade Opera Load In
March 14-18 – 5th Grade Opera
March 17-19 – MS Musical – The Lion King
March 17 – 3rd Grade Walking Tour of Charlotte
March 18 – 7th Grade Asia Day
March 21-24 – 5th Grade Opera
March 25-April 3 – SPRING BREAK
April 4 – Classes resume

Important Note:

We will be using Marianne’s office for state testing this week. We will have testing signs up, but please be quiet in the front office area.  Thank you for your help!

Carpool

We are going to try to be more diligent about turning the carpool phones lines at 2:45 (not 2:40). Please help us by sending students who ride the bus at 2:40. We are hoping this helps you in your classroom.

Lottery

Our annual CSD Lottery will be held this week on Monday.  This can be a very sad and emotional (and sometimes even angry) time for families who want to be at CSD but do not have good luck in the lottery.  Please be extra careful about your words as you are in the community.  While we cannot serve every family who wants to be at CSD, we can certainly care about every family and wish they were with us.  People need always feel heard, seen, and cared about by us at all times……especially the tough times.

NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

The NC Teacher Working Conditions survey that is done in NC every two years will go out March 1.  Please make this a high priority for all lead teachers.  CSD always has 100% participation and this is an important part of the feedback we get as a school and as a state.  Be on the lookout for your survey codes! Thanks, as always, for your thoughtful feedback!

Teaching Tips by Marianne:

I did send this out in an email but thought this was a good reminder.  Parents need to feel like they are being heard.  By showing empathy, care, and understanding we are able to work together collaboratively with one another.

https://www.loveandlogic.com/articles-advice/instant-empathetic-response
https://www.loveandlogic.com/pdfs/pearl_sample.pdf

Great parents love their kids. Great teachers love their students. This love makes them great at what they do. This affection can also lead to parent-teacher conferences where fur gets ruffled and sparks fly.

Our audio, Putting Parents at Ease, provides powerful strategies for keeping things positive and productive. Described below are just a few strategies:

Listen.
Don’t try to fix it before fixing your ears on the other person’s concerns. Listening with sincere empathy and understanding is the single most important skill for working with anyone who is caught up in emotion. Promoting this involves having some key phrases we can fall back upon when we feel attacked:

Tell me more.
Help me understand.
How long have you felt this way?
What would you like to see here?

Each of the above is designed to get the other person talking. The more they talk, the better.

Take notes and read them back to the other person.
To prove that we’ve listened, it’s helpful to jot down verbatim what the other person is saying. Don’t summarize. Don’t paraphrase. Take the time to write down exactly what the other person is saying. This demonstrates our commitment to listen. Oftentimes, it’s also helpful for the other person to hear how crazy they may be sounding. Note: “Crazy” doesn’t mean the person is mentally unstable. It simply means they are crazy in love with their kids or their students.

Have the child do most of the work.
Who is this conference really about? The child should do most of the thinking and working. This happens most effectively when teachers coach children to share their progress with the parent, as well as some possible solutions for improving it. Parents are also wise to ask most of the questions of their child…rather than of their child’s teacher.

Maintain clear roles.
Parents can’t run the classroom for teachers, and teachers can’t run the home for parents. Wise educators describe what they will be doing to help in their classroom, instead of loading the parent with additional duties at home. Likewise, wise parents describe what they will be doing at home, instead of dictating loads of additional duties for the teacher.

When parents focus their energy on parenting well, and teachers focus their energy on teaching well, kids tend to excel. In contrast, when they try to control each other, things get ugly.

Thanks for reading! Our goal is to help as many families as possible. If this is a benefit, forward it to a friend.

Dr. Charles Fay


http://www.mynewsletterbuilder.com/email/newsletter/1411002215

We do have a copy of the audio, Putting Parents at Ease.

Week of February 16

The week ahead…

Dear Staff,

Happy President’s Day!  We hope you all enjoyed the long weekend.  Lets hope that it helps in getting rid of some of the sickness we have had going around lately.  Last week we had several classes with the stomach bug that seemed to spread like wild fire.  Please make sure students are washing their hands before they eat snack and lunch.  Also make sure that we are wiping down tables, door knobs and light switches as best we can to help prevent spreading.  It would be a good idea to remind parents in your newsletters that children should be fever free and have not thrown up for at least 24 hours before they return to school.  Also, please make sure you are having parents check their child/children regularly for lice.  We have had several cases of this in classrooms and the middle school as well.  If you need help checking let admin know and we are happy to help.

On a happier note 🙂 Read Across America day is fast approaching, on March 2- Dr. Seuss’s birthday!  It is a nationwide celebration of reading that happens annually.  Marianne, Juli and I have decided to completely block that day to spend time reading in classrooms…hooray our favorite!  If there are certain times or certain books you would like for us to read let us know and we would be happy to help in your class celebration of reading.  I know last year several classes had mystery readers sign up to read throughout the day, as well as lots of fun Dr. Seuss activities planned.  I remember watching the 4th and 5th graders get so excited about mystery readers and their fun Dr. Seuss reading activities!  We often forget that big kids like to do these things just as much as the little kiddos.  I have listed two websites below if you need help with ideas.  We also found a cute t-shirt that each of us ordered to wear on that day to celebrate.  I listed the link below in case anyone else wanted to order one, because I know many of you are all about the cute t-shirt! 🙂  We hope to help get all children excited about reading!  Have a wonderful week and happy reading!

http://www.seussville.com/Educators/educatorReadAcrossAmerica.php

http://www.nea.org/grants/886.htm

 

The Week at a Glance

Monday, February 16th:
No School – President’s Day Holiday
Tuesday, February 17th:
Webb to Huntersville Oaks
Wednesday, February 18th: 
11:00 – 7th Grade Weather Talk with Al Conklin
Juli at HS doing observations
Dorothy Pagan – Teacher Leader
3:30 – K-7 Staff Meeting
Thursday, February 19th: 
Westbrook/Sharp to Olde Knox Commons
Kindergarten Gallery Crawl
MS Dance Dress Rehearsals (Juli at 8th grade for dance supervision)
Friday, February 20th: 
MS Dance Performances (Marianne at 8th grade for dance supervision)

Looking Ahead….
February 22 – CSD Lottery at HS Black Box
March 2 – Butterfly Project – 6th Grade
March 2 – 5th Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip, Read Across America Day
March 3 – 2nd Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip
March 4 – 2nd Grade Art Gallery
March 4 – 7th Grade Field Trip to Bodyworks at Discovery Place
March 7 – 4th Grade to JA Biztown
March 7 – Parent Advisory – 7:30 at HS
March 9 – Proof of Concept – 5th Grade
March 10 & 11 – 3rd Grade Wax Museum
March 11 – 5th Grade Opera Load In
March 14-18 – 5th Grade Opera
March 17-19 – MS Musical – The Lion King
March 17 – 3rd Grade Walking Tour of Charlotte
March 18 – 7th Grade Asia Day
March 21-24 – 5th Grade Opera
March 25-April 3 – SPRING BREAK
April 4 – Classes resume

Carpool

We are going to try to be more diligent about turning the carpool phones lines at 2:45 (not 2:40). Please help us by sending students who ride the bus at 2:40. We are hoping this helps you in your classroom.

Teaching Tips by Marianne:

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 2.20.21 PM

10 tips for getting your students back on track after a snow day
How can you make the most of post-snow lessons? We asked our followers on Twitter (Psst! Come join us!) how they get their classes back on track after a surprise snow day…or week. Read on for their best tips and stow them away to try after your next snow day!
  1. “I always ask students what they did during their time off & do “you” think it was necessary. I make students stakeholders.”—Teacher @mxdhny66.
  2. “Although my Ss will not be in this situation, I’d do snow-related sci. experiments/tie in thermal energy/transformations.”—Teacher @love5thgrade
  3. “Colorado teachers know all about snow! Engage students by letting them share snow day adventures and make it a learning opp.”—Teacher and designer couple @COTeachContent
  4. “Surprise snow? Snowball fight w/ sight words on paper and write about their fun adventures, then share!”—Teacher @croberson8
  5. “Ss summarize their day off in writing using 10 words or less first thing in AM and share out.” —Teacher @AlieSanterre
  6. “Nothing like some vocabulary basketball! #SpanishClass”—Teacher @clarkjjw
  7. “This year we talked about friction in science with sleds and built our own experiments to try it out!” —Teacher @PopIntoFourth
  8. “We write about it and take turns sharing! Might as well turn the excitement into a lesson.”—Teacher @LyndsayTeaches
  9. “Review the rules, procedures, and previous material in a fun @GetKahoot game. My students ❤ my quizzes.” —Teacher @mcathyg
  10. “Some great learning during snow days, we’ll talk about that, then graph the rate of snowfall from data.” —Teacher @MsWolfinger
And if all else fails, teacher @gary_neuzil has one final, succinct piece of advice:
“Snowball fight.”

Week of February 8, 2016

Dear Staff,

As you all know, the admin team recently took a planning day to assess the needs of our school community and begin to flesh out plans for next school year.  During these meetings, we take a hard look at where we are currently and where we are headed.  We analyze our collective strengths and weaknesses and then start to brainstorm ways in which we can improve our existing programs.  We are constantly striving to diversify our community as we strongly believe that all schools should be microcosms of society, and that differences are to be celebrated as they make all of us richer, wiser, and more well-rounded human beings.  Because we are committed to creating (and maintaining) an inclusive community of learners, it is essential for us, the educators, to stay acutely aware of our surroundings and to be vigilant about keeping our finger on the pulse of that sense of inclusion.  Barbara Coloroso touches on this topic a lot through the context of bullying and hate crimes.  She speaks of the courage it requires to move from being a bystander to a witness and the role we, the adults in these children’s lives, play in helping children acquire such skills.  So as we continue to explore the complex issues of diversity and inclusion, it is our job to stay consistently aware of ourselves as well as others and to remain open-minded to the perspectives of others.  The article below about micro-aggressions is yet another piece to this awareness puzzle.  In an upcoming staff meeting, we will be exploring these issues is greater detail, along with Barbara Coloroso’s Ted Talk message which has been highlighted in previous blog posts.  We hope these messages strike home with each of you and serve as a launching pad for us to have some very important conversations, with each other and with our students.

Juli, Leslie, and Marianne


No, You Can’t Touch My Hair

by Robyn Jackson

 

The other day as I was disembarking my flight, a woman in the row ahead of me turned and said, “Is that your natural hair?”

Her traveling companion assumed she was speaking to her and said, “Huh?”

“Not you,” she swatted at her travel companion and pointed at me. “I was talking to that one.” She repeated her question much more loudly this time. “Is that your natural hair?”

Everyone in our vicinity turned and looked at me.

Here we go, I sighed to myself. You see, this type of thing happens to me all the time not just when I’m traveling but when I am conducting trainings or giving keynote addresses. I am frequently asked if I am “all black, or mixed with something else,” or told that I am so “articulate,” or I’m asked about my hair in ways that are invasive or downright insulting (yes it’s all mine and no you cannot touch it). Over the years, I’ve learned to handle it with as much grace as I can muster, choosing (most of the time) to be generous and extend the benefit of the doubt, but that doesn’t mean that these subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) reminders of my “otherness” don’t take their toll.

And if it is happening to me, I know it is happening to our students.

In fact, every time a child is told that she is “pretty for a dark-skinned girl,” or that “he speaks English well for a immigrant” or that he is “talkative for an Asian kid.” Any time a student of color is asked if he plays ball, or is encouraged to rap, or is assumed to be from poverty or a single home. Any time a student’s culture is reduced to their food (“You’re from Ethiopia? Oooh, I love Ethiopian food!”) or a stereotype (“I bet your hair is really pretty underneath that head scarf. It’s a shame that you never get to show it.”) or a movie (“I just saw Straight Outta Compton and I finally get why you’re so angry all the time.”), they are being marginalized.

There’s a name for these brief, everyday exchanges that seem innocent but actually send denigrating messages to students based purely on their race, gender, ethnicity, or sexuality. It’s called micro-aggression. And, while it is more subtle than say burning a cross in someone’s yard, it’s just as insidious. Here’s why.

Micro-aggressions often happen unintentionally. The person committing the micro-aggression typically means no offence and may not be aware that they are causing any harm. And if you don’t know that you are hurting your students, it’s really hard to stop it.

Now, I know that this conversation makes some of you uncomfortable. Others will accuse me of too much political correctness. But those of you who want to do all that you can to make your classroom a safe and welcoming place for every student will do well to consider how you may be unintentionally committing micro-aggressions. The more aware you are, the more you’ll be able to avoid it.

http://mindstepsinc.com/2016/01/no-you-cant-touch-my-hair/

Tool_Recognizing_Microaggressions

The Week at a Glance

Monday, February 8th:
Juli at HS campus all day doing teacher observations.
Tuesday, February 9th:
K7 Teacher Appreciation Dessert Tray!!!
Wednesday, February 10th: 
Lucia Washam Teacher Leader
1st Grade Performances
Valentine Poem Sharing (K-5)
Juli in Greensboro at Homebase Meeting
Thursday, February 11th: 
TEACHER WORKDAYS & 6th Grade SLC’s
Juli in Greensboro at Homebase Meeting
Friday, February 12th: 
TEACHER WORKDAYS & 6th Grade SLC’s
Looking Ahead….
February 15 – PRESIDENT’S DAY HOLIDAY – NO SCHOOL
February 18 – Kindergarten Gallery Crawl
February 18-19 – MS (6/7/8) Dance Performances
February 22 – CSD Lottery at HS Black Box
March 2 – Butterfly Project – 6th Grade
March 3 – 2nd Grade Children’s Theater Field Trip
March 4 – 2nd Grade Art Gallery
March 4 – 7th Grade Field Trip to Bodyworks at Discovery Place
March 7 – 4th Grade to JA Biztown
March 7 – Parent Advisory – 7:30 at HS
March 9 – Proof of Concept – 5th Grade
March 10 & 11 – 3rd Grade Wax Museum
March 11 – 5th Grade Opera Load In
March 14-18 – 5th Grade Opera
March 17-19 – MS Musical – The Lion King
March 17 – 3rd Grade Walking Tour of Charlotte
March 18 – 7th Grade Asia Day
March 21-24 – 5th Grade Opera
March 25-April 3 – SPRING BREAK
April 4 – Classes resume

Important Reminders:

Report Cards will be emailed to parents on Tuesday, February 16th.

VALENTINES:  Please check in with students individually to make sure they have a plan for completion as we know this can be stressful and overwhelming for some families. Let us know if you have any situations that require additional help.  Additionally, please gently encourage families to focus on the actual Valentine rather than the “presentation” or a “gift” that may come with it.  Thanks for all of your help!

Teaching Tips by Marianne:

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 11.15.04 AM

https://scottwoodsmakeslists.wordpress.com/2016/01/30/28-black-picture-books-that-arent-about-boycotts-buses-or-basketball/

https://faculty.diversity.ucla.edu/resources-for/teaching/diversity-in-the-classroom-booklet

https://faculty.diversity.ucla.edu/publications/creating-a-positive-classroom-climate-for-diversity